The Roseboro’s Foundation

The original hotel was built on whiskey barrels filled with concrete. Over times, the barrels sunk into the ground – over two feet. You can still see a few of the barrels in the basement today. However, in the past few years, the hotel has been jacked up and new concrete piers and footings have been put in. The previous owners did quite a bit of foundation work. However, when I bought it, I did substantial work on the foundation that took over a year to complete. All of the new footings in the basement had to be hand dug; dirt and rock had to be hand carried out in buckets. Since we could only jack the building up a 1/2″ a day, it took us almost a year to bring it level. Even then, walls cracked and bowed. Many had to be replaced. It now is structurally sound and is starting to look great!

The Roseboro Beginnings

Here are photos of the Rosenberg House and Rosenberg Hotel before the additional stories were added and the three buildings joined into one massive hotel – renamed to The Roseboro.

The Roseboro Dining Room to Debut Soon

Making great progress on The Roseboro dining room. We will have it ready for debut on March 24th at the Sharon Springs Chamber Mixer. The trim around the ceiling used to be green and the walls were a peach color.

We are painting the trim gold, the columns and bottom walls a deep burgundy with cream colored walls. The drapes will match the fabric on the chairs. We have just completed a new women’s bathroom off the main lobby and are working on a new men’s bathroom as well. The new bathrooms are all ADA compliant. You will have to come to the Mixer and check it out. The Mixer is open to the public.

Going Up?

This door on the roof leads to the elevator shaft that has seven stops. In 1900, when three buildings were connected into one, the buildings were at different level. The elevator has stops on each half floor and the door opens on each side. The 1930s Otis elevator is not currently in operation, but is repairable (for a mere $25k!). It still has the old crank lever that was operated by the bellman.